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How to see more and care less: The art of Georgia O'Keeffe - Iseult Gillespie | ARTLECTURE

How to see more and care less: The art of Georgia O'Keeffe - Iseult Gillespie

-An Animated Video Tells the Story-

/Artlecture/
by TED-Ed/Josh Jones
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How to see more and care less: The art of Georgia O'Keeffe - Iseult Gillespie
-An Animated Video Tells the Story-

HIGHLIGHT


Get to know the life and works of painter and sculptor Georgia O’Keeffe, whose art became a cornerstone of American Modernism.

Feeling disconnected from creating art within classical conventions, artist Georgia O’Keeffe began experimenting with abstract drawings that defied easy classification. Using the shapes and rhythms of nature to capture her internal world, these experiments became the cornerstone of the movement known as American Modernism. Iseult Gillespie explores the works of the elusive painter and sculptor.


When Georgia O’Keeffe first saw the home in Abiquiú, in Northern New Mexico that she would purchase from the Catholic Church in 1945 “the 5,000-square-foot compound was in ruins,” writes the Georgia O’Keeffe Museum. The artist immediately seized on its potential: “As I climbed and walked about in the ruin,” she remembers, “I found a patio with a very pretty well house and bucket to draw up water. It was a good-sized patio with a long wall with a door on one side. That wall with a door in it was something I had to have.”





The story about her discovery of the famous house—photographed hundreds of times by her and dozens of others—seems emblematic of the decades of decisive, mature painting and photography. Her vision seems supremely confident and entirely sui generis—a passionate way of seeing as distinctive as van Gogh’s. But like van Gogh, and every other famous artist, O’Keeffe served an apprentice period, which at the turn of the 20th century meant learning classical techniques. Once in New York, she became known for experimental paintings of skyscrapers and her stunning abstract flowers.





O’Keeffe’s work has often been reduced to prurient speculation about the resemblance of her flowers to female genitalia, a Freudian lens she categorically dismissed: “She resented the male gaze that dominated the art world and demanded her work be respected for its emotional evocation of the natural world.” See high-resolution scans of O’Keeffe’s body of work, from the 1900s to the 1980s, at the Georgia O’Keeffe Collections Online and learn more about her at the Georgia O’Keeffe Museum Library and Archive. / Josh Jones


all images/words ⓒ the artist(s) and organization(s)
 Artistnote.com , Artlecture.com

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Lesson by Iseult Gillespie, directed by Lisa LaBracio.