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Draining the Oceans | ARTLECTURE

Draining the Oceans

-Draining Earth's oceans, revealing the two-thirds of Earth's surface we don't get to see-

/Service & Device/
by Dr James O'Donoghue
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Draining the Oceans
-Draining Earth's oceans, revealing the two-thirds of Earth's surface we don't get to see-

HIGHLIGHT


What the Earth Would Look Like If We Drained the Water from the Oceans

Three fifths of the Earth's surface is under the ocean, and the ocean floor is as rich in detail as the land surface with which we are familiar. This animation simulates a drop in sea level that gradually reveals this detail. As the sea level drops, the continental shelves appear immediately. They are mostly visible by a depth of 140 meters, except for the Arctic and Antarctic regions, where the shelves are deeper. The mid-ocean ridges start to appear at a depth of 2000 to 3000 meters. By 6000 meters, most of the ocean is drained except for the deep ocean trenches, the deepest of which is the Marianas Trench at a depth of 10,911 meters.




Formerly a NASA Fellow at the Goddard Space Flight CenterDr James O'Donoghue now works as a planetary scientist at the Japanese space agency JAXA. He also hosts a video channel on YouTube. Above, you can watch his high-res remake of a NASA animation produced back in 2008. Here's how NASA framed the original clip:



Three fifths of the Earth's surface is under the ocean, and the ocean floor is as rich in detail as the land surface with which we are familiar. This animation simulates a drop in sea level that gradually reveals this detail. As the sea level drops, the continental shelves appear immediately. They are mostly visible by a depth of 140 meters, except for the Arctic and Antarctic regions, where the shelves are deeper. The mid-ocean ridges start to appear at a depth of 2000 to 3000 meters. By 6000 meters, most of the ocean is drained except for the deep ocean trenches, the deepest of which is the Marianas Trench at a depth of 10,911 meters.



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Remake of an animation NASA made back in 2008, but at high resolution and with edited timing (https://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/3487), the previous version was 1024x512 while this one is 3840x2160 (4K).